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my name is Jason Rubinstein I am not anonymous

i tweet things too

    sexincomics:

    Ironwood, by Bill Willingham.

    — 1 day ago with 10 notes
    gailsimone:

changingshades:

Gender roles
source Dynamite Red Sonja #12 by Gail Simone and Walter Geovani

Got lots of requests for more Rukaua and he’s barely in the issue. :)

    gailsimone:

    changingshades:

    Gender roles

    source Dynamite Red Sonja #12 by Gail Simone and Walter Geovani

    Got lots of requests for more Rukaua and he’s barely in the issue. :)

    — 1 day ago with 692 notes
    pizza-party:

But, because he’s planned for every contingency, this is where the Batman of Zur-En-Arrh takes over!

    pizza-party:

    But, because he’s planned for every contingency, this is where the Batman of Zur-En-Arrh takes over!

    (Source: arcaneimages)

    — 1 day ago with 170 notes
    drdavidmrmack:

loveandzombies:

watching dexter & this huge ass mural of scarab from kabuki showed up.
geeking out a little bit.

Notice the KABUKI masks and Sculptures in the back room.  Kabuki framed prints, and books around the apartment. 
Photos from on the set of DEXTER here:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150391040541295.358523.21231086294&type=3

    drdavidmrmack:

    loveandzombies:

    watching dexter & this huge ass mural of scarab from kabuki showed up.

    geeking out a little bit.

    Notice the KABUKI masks and Sculptures in the back room.  Kabuki framed prints, and books around the apartment. 

    Photos from on the set of DEXTER here:

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150391040541295.358523.21231086294&type=3

    (Source: catiebat, via drdavidmrmack)

    — 2 days ago with 59 notes
    This Licensed T-Shirt Tells You a Lot About How DC Comics Views Wonder Woman

    dcwomenkickingass:

    Warner Bros. makes a lot of money each year licensing the rights to the superhero IP of DC Comics. And that includes literally hundreds of t-shirts. We know that licensing can be pretty strict. It took a public shaming for them to allow the Superman logo to be used on a statue of a young fan who had been starved to death.

    So it’s always interesting to what DOES get signed off on. Like this shirt. 

    Read More

    (Source: superheroden.com)

    — 2 days ago with 1232 notes

    pizza-party:

    All the info from the original post was erased, but my Darn Knight homage to notalkingplz that quotes Gossip Girl is still going around.

    this is my first “always reblog”

    — 2 days ago with 613 notes
    comicsalliance:

WHY BIG SUPERHERO MUSCLES AREN’T ‘THE SAME THING’ AS SEXY CURVES
By Andrew Wheeler
As a man who reads superhero comics, I confess that I share a commonly-held prurient interest in big-chested, long-legged heroes in skin-baring costumes that barely cover their naughty bits — or as I like to call him, Namor.
Sadly, Namor is pretty much alone in his category. Contrary to the perception that male heroes in comics are frequently sexually objectified, it’s my experience that even Namor is only rarely presented as someone to lust over. Yet I’m fortunate that my tastes run towards the Hemsworth end of the scale. Like many straight men, I admire the kind of buff dudes that are the staple of superhero comics, even though they are rarely sexualized. If I shared the tastes of most of the women I know, I think I’d find superhero comics an even more frustratingly sexless wasteland.
Big muscles are a male fantasy. That’s not to say that women aren’t ever into them, but let’s face facts; women have never been the primary target audience for superhero comics, and male heroes are drawn with big muscles anyway. Make no mistake; women are there. But those big muscles are not there for women. They’re there for men; straight men who find male power exhilarating. If women didn’t exist, superheroes would be drawn just as buff as they are today — because as far as most superhero comics are concerned, women as consumers do not exist.
Yet I’ve seen it said more times than I can count that male heroes are objectified, sexualized, idealized, just the same as the women — because they’re big and ripped and dressed in tight costumes. It’s an idea that’s completely tied up in the narcissistic notion that androphile women are attracted to the same qualities that men find appealing.
Talk to a few women, and you’ll find that’s broadly untrue.
READ MORE

    comicsalliance:

    WHY BIG SUPERHERO MUSCLES AREN’T ‘THE SAME THING’ AS SEXY CURVES

    By Andrew Wheeler

    As a man who reads superhero comics, I confess that I share a commonly-held prurient interest in big-chested, long-legged heroes in skin-baring costumes that barely cover their naughty bits — or as I like to call him, Namor.

    Sadly, Namor is pretty much alone in his category. Contrary to the perception that male heroes in comics are frequently sexually objectified, it’s my experience that even Namor is only rarely presented as someone to lust over. Yet I’m fortunate that my tastes run towards the Hemsworth end of the scale. Like many straight men, I admire the kind of buff dudes that are the staple of superhero comics, even though they are rarely sexualized. If I shared the tastes of most of the women I know, I think I’d find superhero comics an even more frustratingly sexless wasteland.

    Big muscles are a male fantasy. That’s not to say that women aren’t ever into them, but let’s face facts; women have never been the primary target audience for superhero comics, and male heroes are drawn with big muscles anyway. Make no mistake; women are there. But those big muscles are not there for women. They’re there for men; straight men who find male power exhilarating. If women didn’t exist, superheroes would be drawn just as buff as they are today — because as far as most superhero comics are concerned, women as consumers do not exist.

    Yet I’ve seen it said more times than I can count that male heroes are objectified, sexualized, idealized, just the same as the women — because they’re big and ripped and dressed in tight costumes. It’s an idea that’s completely tied up in the narcissistic notion that androphile women are attracted to the same qualities that men find appealing.

    Talk to a few women, and you’ll find that’s broadly untrue.

    READ MORE

    (via kierongillen)

    — 5 days ago with 7458 notes

    aleskot:

    Winter Soldier #1: in your stores Wednesday, 10/01/2014. 

    Come get it.

    oh my fucking god that art

    — 5 days ago with 269 notes

    pizza-party:

    gameraboy:

    The very first Peanuts strip, October 2, 1950

    It ain’t easy being Charlie Brown.

    (via sfcartoonartmuseum)

    — 5 days ago with 13733 notes

    uncannybrettwhite:

    davizlopez:

    Character sheets for X-Men.

    This is why David Lopez is the greatest.

    (via chrissamnee)

    — 5 days ago with 514 notes